"In the end all books are written for your friends. The problem after writing One Hundred Years of Solitude was that now I no longer know whom of the millions of readers I am writing for; this upsets and inhibits me. It’s like a million eyes are looking at you and you don’t really know what they think."

Gabriel García Márquez (March 6, 1927 – April 17, 2014) in this altogether excellent 1981 Paris Review interview, a fine manifestation of the magazine’s mastery of the art of the interview. (via explore-blog)

dynamicafrica:

In filmmaker Karim Zoubir’s documentary for Al Jazeera’s Witness segment, we meet Casablanca-based divorced single mother and camerawoman Khadija.

Although her family do not approve of Khadija’s profession as a wedding videographer as it keeps her away ‘til very later hours at night, she is the main breadwinner amongst them (she lives her parents, her brothers and her sister).

The realities of Khadija’s everyday life and unconventional profession, given the context of her environment, are so well captured in this near-50 minute peek inside of her world. From interactions with her closest friends and family, to potential clients and business partners.

More and more we’ve got petty people running a series of police states here in the land of the free. Be brave.
vicemag:

The Police Raided My Friend’s House Over a Parody Twitter Account 
Jon Daniel woke up on Thursday morning to a news crew in his living room, which was a welcome change from the company he had on Tuesday night, when the Peoria, Illinois, police came crashing through the door. The officers tore the 28-year-old’s home apart, seizing electronics and taking several of his roommates in for questioning; one woman who lived there spent three hours in an interrogation room. All for a parody Twitter account.
Yes, the cops raided Daniel’s home because they wanted to find out who was behind @peoriamayor, an account that had been shut down weeks ago by Twitter. When it was active, Daniel used it to portray Jim Ardis, the mayor of Peoria, as a weed-smoking, stripper-loving, Midwestern answer to Rob Ford. The account never had more than 50 followers, and Twitter had killed it because it wasn’t clearly marked as a parody. It was a joke, a lark—but it brought the police to Daniel’s door. The cops even took Daniel and one of his housemates in for in-depth questioning—they showed up at their jobs, cuffed them, and confiscated their phones—because of a bunch of Twitter jokes.
Now Daniel’s panicking.
“I’m going to fucking jail,” he told me yesterday when he was on a break from his job as a line cook. “They’re going to haul me away for this shit.”
Continue

More and more we’ve got petty people running a series of police states here in the land of the free. Be brave.

vicemag:

The Police Raided My Friend’s House Over a Parody Twitter Account 

Jon Daniel woke up on Thursday morning to a news crew in his living room, which was a welcome change from the company he had on Tuesday night, when the Peoria, Illinois, police came crashing through the door. The officers tore the 28-year-old’s home apart, seizing electronics and taking several of his roommates in for questioning; one woman who lived there spent three hours in an interrogation room. All for a parody Twitter account.

Yes, the cops raided Daniel’s home because they wanted to find out who was behind @peoriamayor, an account that had been shut down weeks ago by Twitter. When it was active, Daniel used it to portray Jim Ardis, the mayor of Peoria, as a weed-smoking, stripper-loving, Midwestern answer to Rob Ford. The account never had more than 50 followers, and Twitter had killed it because it wasn’t clearly marked as a parody. It was a joke, a lark—but it brought the police to Daniel’s door. The cops even took Daniel and one of his housemates in for in-depth questioning—they showed up at their jobs, cuffed them, and confiscated their phones—because of a bunch of Twitter jokes.

Now Daniel’s panicking.

“I’m going to fucking jail,” he told me yesterday when he was on a break from his job as a line cook. “They’re going to haul me away for this shit.”

Continue

dynamicafrica:

My Mother’s Song - Trailer #1 (Dir. Eric Msumanje | 2013)

A weak voice from a face unseen speaks in hushed tones, unsettling the tranquil sounds of an ambiguous twilight time of day with an arresting soliloquy of pain and trauma. She is one of many in filmmaker Eric Msumanje’s piercing collection of stories shared in his short film My Mother’s Songs.

My Mother’s Songs, depicts a collection of traumatic experiences through the eyes of several young women desperately trying to make sense of their existence.

My Mother’s Songs, is set in a particular part of the African landscape that examines inter-generational trauma. This theme is connected to Africa’s history of brutal colonialism, shattered dreams from independence, and chronic poverty. The film depicts a collection of traumatic experiences through the eyes of several young women desperately trying to make sense of their existence.

- Director, writer, producer and winner of the Princess Grace Foundation - USA 2012 John H. Johnson Film Award, Erick Msumanje.

fyblackwomenart:

Medica Bruja - Descarga Espiritual by Chrislor
"One of the gifts of being a writer is that it gives you an excuse to do things, to go places and explore. Another is that writing motivates you to look closely at life, at life as it lurches by and tramps around."

— Anne Lamott, from Bird by Bird, via Brainpickings (via bostonpoetryslam)

fyblackwomenart:

Yarah Bravo by CtrHell
fyblackwomenart:

The African Angel by Holly Sierra
fyblackwomenart:

Birth of Attis by BeataViscera

bettinajudd:

@blackpeculiar (Khadijah Queen) is brilliant and so is this digital chap published with Sibling Rivalry press. This chap is a brilliant holla back at the male gaze, even if that male is famous. And, well, that’s the surface of it. On a place just underneath that is a self reflective story of coming into womanhood, self-love, and critical clap back in a culture obsessed with lookism.

kushandwizdom:

Good Vibes HERE
"I really believe that applying poetry, or language in general, to trauma is the ultimate act of reclaiming. Naming something gives you a sort of ownership over it (hey, colonialism did it all the time, haha), so choosing words that identify your experience makes it less of this looming unknown that has you at its mercy. It makes everything less ‘something that happened to me’ and more ‘experience/story that belongs to me,’ you know?"

— Safia Elhillo, interviewed for The Body Narratives (via bostonpoetryslam)

schomburgcenter:

Join us Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 6:30pm for Visually Speaking: A Worldview from Guyana.
Many contemporary depictions of Guyana and its people—whether via the image or the written word—continue to center on the exotic, the colonial, and the touristic. Award-winning photographers Nikki Kahn and Keisha Scarville will share their artistic visions and portfolios and explore their ongoing work to tell Guyana’s stories and to counter historic and contemporary stereotypes about the former British colony and its wide-reaching Diaspora.
For more information and to RSVP, click here. 

schomburgcenter:

Join us Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 6:30pm for Visually Speaking: A Worldview from Guyana.

Many contemporary depictions of Guyana and its people—whether via the image or the written word—continue to center on the exotic, the colonial, and the touristic. Award-winning photographers Nikki Kahn and Keisha Scarville will share their artistic visions and portfolios and explore their ongoing work to tell Guyana’s stories and to counter historic and contemporary stereotypes about the former British colony and its wide-reaching Diaspora.

For more information and to RSVP, click here

(via bettinajudd)

fyblackwomenart:

Midnight Lover  by TerrinArt
papermagazine:

Naomi Campbell, photographed by Edward Maxey for Paper, November 1990. From “Invisible Beauty.”

papermagazine:

Naomi Campbell, photographed by Edward Maxey for Paper, November 1990. From “Invisible Beauty.”

(via smartgirlsattheparty)